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VDW+04

S. Vanni, M. Dojat, J. Warnking, C. Delon-Martin, C. Segebarth, J. Bullier. Timing of interactions across the visual field in the human cortex. NeuroImage, 21(3):818-828, 2004.

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Abstract

While it is generally believed that interactions across long distances in the visual field occur only in the higher-order cortical areas, other results suggest that such interactions are processed very early. In the preceding paper, we identified the latencies within a subset of cortical areas in the human visual system. In the present study, we test in which areas and at which latencies the responses to two visual patterns start interacting. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging directly combined with visual-evoked potential source analysis. Interactions appeared first anterolaterally to the retinotopic areas, at 80 ms for two stimuli presented in the left lower visual quadrant and at 100 ms for symmetrical stimulation of both lower quadrants. In the lateral occipital-V5 region (LOV5), two patterns presented simultaneously in one quadrant elicited a response with shorter latency and infra-linear addition of the amplitudes compared with the patterns presented separately. For bilateral stimulation, the timing of the LOV5 response coincided with the response to contralateral stimulation alone. Other visual areas showed interactions appearing later than within LOV5: starting at 150 ms in V1, at 120 ms in V3-V3a for the left visual hemifield stimulation and at 160 ms for both visual hemifields stimulation. Our data show that distinct patterns in the visual field interact first in LOV5, suggesting that this region must be the first to pool spatial information across the whole visual field

Keywords

[ Adult ] [ Brain mapping ] [ Evoked potentials ] [ Visual/physiology ] [ Female ] [ Human ] [ Individuality ] [ Laterality/physiology ] [ Magnetic resonance imaging ] [ Male ] [ Middle aged ] [ Models ] [ Neurological ] [ Motion perception/physiology ] [ Photic stimulation ] [ Retina/physiology ] [ Support ] [ Non-u.s. gov't ] [ Visual cortex/*physiology ] [ Visual fields/*physiology ] [ Visual perception/physiology ]

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S. Vanni
M. Dojat
J. M. Warnking
C. Delon-Martin
C. Segebarth
J. Bullier

BibTex Reference

@article{VDW+04,
   Author = {Vanni, S. and Dojat, M. and Warnking, J. and Delon-Martin, C. and Segebarth, C. and Bullier, J.},
   Title = {Timing of interactions across the visual field in the human cortex},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {818--828},
   Year = {2004}
}

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